My Employee is Trashing Us on Social Media

social media

Dear Kelly,

My employee in customer service is a decent performer but she definitely brings the drama. She got really mad about a schedule change the other day and let loose on her Facebook page. She’s friends with a lot of people at our office, including me, and now people are “liking” her post and there’s a ton of gossip around it. It’s totally distracting from our work.

The schedule change is unpopular (I don’t like it either) but the company had to do it so they could put together a way to cover expanded hours because our business is growing. My manager and other people are asking what I’m going to do about the Facebook post and I’m not sure what to tell them.

What do you think?

Jesse

Hi Jesse,

Change is the only constant in life. Your employees are reacting in an expected way to a change they don’t like, and it’s your job to help them through that process. You said yourself that you don’t like the change, but you recognize it’s needed for business reasons.

Have you gotten your team together to make sure they are all aware of why the change is necessary? Do they believe that you understand the many difficulties the change might present, like childcare challenges, personal adjustments, and other things that can affect them in significant ways? Do they know that you appreciate their willingness to work through this?

That’s the place to start, with real, transparent communication. You may find that if you are willing to listen, support and understand them, your team will adjust more quickly to these tough changes. None of you has a choice about the schedule changes-that’s true. But ignoring the fact that it’s a tough change isn’t going to solve this problem. It will only lead your employees to think they are not valued, and will hurt the level of trust, engagement and commitment of your team.

As far as the social media postings, tread carefully. Consult with your HR department and your company’s legal counsel. The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) warns that social media policies “should not be so sweeping that they prohibit the kinds of activity protected by federal labor law, such as the discussion of wages or working conditions among employees.” Scheduling can be characterized as working conditions. So be sure to get advice before deciding whether to address the post, and how to communicate that.

You can coach your employees on finding proactive solutions to problems, and encouraging them to come up with ideas instead of complaining. By rewarding this positive behavior, and ignoring the drama, you may find that it dissipates more quickly. If you focus on the trust, transparency and communication, you may find that the social media issues and gossip won’t be a problem anymore.

Best wishes,

Kelly

Visit Solve HR, Inc.

Photo credit: Jason A. Howie via Foter.com / CC BY

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Author: Kelly Marinelli

HR Consultant & employment compliance geek

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