Recruiting Mature Workers Just Got Easier

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Did you know that AARP, the huge organization to advance the interests of people as they age in the United States, has launched a job board? Take a look at the new board here.

My trial run on the board revealed that it’s got all of the basic features job seekers expect to see in a job search site. One suggestion I’d make is that if the tool is meant to appeal to recruits who may be looking for flexible scheduling or an alternative work arrangement, maybe more categories are in order beyond full-time and part-time. The options for employers posting and reviewing applicants look useful and appropriate at first glance. But one thing really jumped out at me.

If your organization signs an Employer Pledge, it can earn a 30% discount on job posting packages during the launch period. Standard packages begin at $199, and Enhanced packages, with increased visibility for job postings, start at $399. More information can be found on this page.

According the AARP, the Employer Pledge involves the following:

Working with AARP, participating organizations have signed a pledge that they:

  • Believe in equal opportunity for all workers, regardless of age
  • Believe that 50+ workers should have a level playing field in their ability to compete for and obtain jobs
  • Recognize the value of experienced workers
  • Recruit across diverse age groups and consider all applicants on an equal basis.

Here is the AARP Employer Pledge overview, if you’d like to check it out.

The tagline is “Experience Valued.” As many baby boomers, and soon, Gen Xers join the ranks of age 50+ workers, and organizations look for ways to cut costs by shedding more expensive salaries in favor of early-career professionals, remembering the value of experience is critical. A 2015 AARP Study (analyzed by the Society for Human Resource Management, SHRM) concluded that the value of employing older workers is substantial, while the incremental cost of hiring and retaining them is only 1-2% over earlier career employees.

SHRM and the SHRM Foundation found the aging workforce worthy of a substantial research initiative in 2016. The results and tools for successfully managing an aging workforce are detailed and useful. According to the SHRM Foundation’s Guide to Leveraging the Talents of Mature Employees, the population of younger workers with the skills needed for success in today’s environment is too small to step into the shoes of the aging Baby Boomer generation. As these less experienced workers build their skills and experience, aging workers can take advantage of flexibility in scheduling and role design, if employers are willing to offer it, in order to fill gaps.  SHRM’s suggestions for recruiting mature workers include identifying sources of talent that will include older adults. AARP’s new job board could be a good fit for that need.

Older workers often have wisdom, institutional knowledge, experience and a strong work ethic. Check the data, and be sure you aren’t overestimating the costs, and underestimating the benefits, of recruiting, hiring and retaining them.

Photo credit: tec_estromberg via Foter.com / CC BY

 

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10 Steps for Finding and Keeping the Right Hires

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Sometimes I daydream about the ideal HR world. Yes, it’s filled with rainbows and trees that grow salt water taffy. Even in my HR dream world, I need to hire people and help my clients do the same, so this is my ideal talent acquisition process. Tell me if this is what it looks like in your perfect HR vision:

  1. You have a clear view of which jobs are likely to be open, and when. You gathered, reviewed and analyzed the data on your hiring in the past three years, and you know which jobs and job groups tend to need filling. You also know the seasonality of your business, and can plan ahead for hiring needs.
  2. Job seekers and referrals to reach them are already in your pipeline. You know many sources for great candidates that you can reach at the click of a mouse or by placing a phone call, because you are continuously doing the groundwork of sourcing for your most-often open positions.
  3. You have job postings updated, paired with sticky videos and graphics, and ready to go at a moment’s notice. With all of the many platforms for recruiting, and all of the creative work your company’s marketing group is doing, why reinvent the wheel? Encourage your Talent Acquisition team to partner with Marketing to come up with effective messages and graphics that are consistent with the branding and marketing your company is already doing, and tailored toward recruiting new hires.
  4. You know where to post to find the right-fit candidates. You can’t post openings on your website and forget it if you want to effectively recruit in today’s market. Reducing your time to fill, attracting the right candidates, running an efficient hiring process and getting the right hire all depend on being intentional in your posting. In addition, since you are looking to increase diversity in your job seeker pool, you are also reaching out to specialty sources to post your openings.
  5. Your recruiters know the jobs and your hiring leaders’ specific needs. Do your recruiters know how to screen job seekers the right way, so your hiring managers are getting the best group of candidates to review? Instead of having a “check the box” mentality, your recruiters are willing and able to understand the job so that they can analyze the job seeker pool in a more sophisticated way. You make sure your smart TA team is functioning at their top efficiency and effectiveness, and not making excuses about how they don’t have time to fully evaluate candidates. And there’s absolutely NO “fire hose” candidate throughput. Managers don’t have time for that!
  6. Your Talent Acquisition team is willing to tell managers the truth, even if they don’t want to hear it. Like many managers, mine sometimes want to insist on looking for the candidate that doesn’t exist-the early career Harvard MBA with 10 years of experience in mergers and acquisitions that is excited to relocate to Sioux Falls for a salary of $40,000 per year. Your recruiters and TA leaders have built trust with the business, so when they push back, hiring leaders may not like it, but they will listen.
  7. You know which competencies lead to success in the roles at your company, and how to assess for them in the hiring process. You provide training and development for hiring leaders and others on how to effectively interview and assess talent, whether you have pre-hire assessments formally implemented or not. And you look back at how hires have performed, so we know if we’re doing it right.
  8. You have access to compliance resources to ensure that your recruiting and hiring process is not only effective, but consistent with legal requirements. You understand the potential for adverse impact and discrimination, and know how to avoid them in your talent acquisition activities, as well as how to properly document your processes to reduce risk.
  9. You use data to pinpoint the sourcing, recruiting and hiring activities that deliver the best ROI. You don’t just throw things out there-you continuously review performance and assess against benchmarks that make sense for your business. Then you adjust your process for maximum value.
  10. The first-year onboarding program at your company is up and running for every new hire, starting at offer acceptance. You know that when you deliver an offer letter and receive an acceptance from a new hire, there will be a seamless handoff to the background check process, ordering needed equipment and space, and delivering a welcome gift to your newest team member. When she arrives at work, she will instantly become a part of your team, learn about company culture and values, and begin her training to set her up for success in her new role. She also will feel the warmth and appreciation of your employees and management, and be glad she decided to spend a big part of her life working with your company toward mutual success. And she will hear from her manager, mentor and HR at regular intervals to identify her needs and reinforce the company’s culture and values, over the course of the first year of her employment and beyond.  

One more thing: if my company’s TA team is working as a department and sharing its expertise with other areas of HR and the business, it goes without saying that we won’t have silos and we’ll work together seamlessly, learning from each other and supporting each other. It’s my ideal HR world, so I get to have it the way I want it!

What did I miss? Share your thoughts in the comments.

Visit Solve HR, Inc.

Photo credit: stevendepolo via Foter.com / CC BY